Sweet and Salty Graham Cracker Toffee

Since this is my second time making these in February (or in two weeks to be more precise), I figured I’d better share the recipe so you can all become addicted, too. I made them first with almonds, and today I made them with pecans. I love them both, but if I had to pick a winner, pecans would take the prize. Either way, they are delicious, and if you don’t like nuts, leave them out altogether.

These really need no introduction. Just look at the pictures, and imagine the taste of salted, caramelized brown sugar with crunchy pecans or almonds and buttery graham crackers.

Yes. You need it. I know.

Sweet and Salty Graham Cracker Toffee

Ingredients:

  • About 14 sheets of graham crackers broken along perforations into 4 pieces each
  • 2 1/2 sticks butter
  • 2 cups brown sugar, light or dark (I used dark)
  • 1 cup slivered almonds or chopped pecans
  • Sea salt

To prepare:

Preheat oven to 350.

Line a rimmed 1/2 sheet pan (18x13x1) with parchment or a non stick silicon baking mat. Cover baking sheet with Graham crackers. Get as many as you can on the sheet in a single layer, breaking some if necessary.

In a saucepan, heat butter and sugar until melted and bubbly. Add nuts.

Pour sugar mixture as evenly as you can over Graham crackers. Carefully (it’s hot!) spread to distribute nuts.

Place in oven and bake for 12 minutes.

Remove from oven and sprinkle with sea salt while still hot.

Let cool for an hour at least, but longer is fine, too. Overnight is even better. (Try to wait that long to eat some. I dare you.)

Break into pieces and enjoy!

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Slow Roasted Tomato and Goat Cheese Crostini

Thanks to the lovely and talented Selma of Selma’s Table, a beautiful and delicious blog that I implore you to visit, I am participating in my very first blog party in celebration of Fiesta Friday’s first anniversary. Very exciting. There is such a wonderful community of bloggers, and I love meeting new friends who are so gracious and welcoming. I’m looking forward to meeting many more at the fiesta!

To get the party started, today’s theme is “happy hour,” and since happy hour isn’t complete without drinks and little bites I am sharing a few wine recommendations and my delicious recipe for slow roasted tomatoes, which I love to serve over goat cheese-topped, crispy baguette slices. Such an easy and beautiful appetizer. I hope you love it!

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Let’s begin with a drink, shall we? I am not much of a cocktail aficionado, but I am a wine lover, and these crostini pair beautifully with a crisp, cool white wine. These are my three favorites, and each one will compliment the tangy, creamy goat cheese, and the jammy, sweet tomatoes. It’s a winning combo whichever wine you choose. The first is Despagne Eclat de Sauvignon—a lovely, crisp white from the Bordeaux region of France. This wine won my heart with its refreshingly tart, almost effervescent grapefruit notes. I was pretty impressed with myself on this one, because I immediately tasted the grapefruit notes and, later, when I did some research I saw that many other tasters had described it this way! Next is my old standby: Pinot Grigio. I am a big fan of Cavit Pinot Grigio—Italian, crisp, fruity but not sweet. I have often described it as a very “friendly” wine, since everyone likes it and it’s always invited to the party. Finally, the H.B. Picpoul de Pinet is a wonderfully intriguing wine made in the South of France. It is crisp and dry with hints of citrus—delicate, floral, and really worth trying. These are three of my favorite whites—and guess what—they are all under $10 (at least they are at my local Wegmans!). In my opinion, good wine does not mean expensive wine. Drink what you love—life is too short to drink bad, expensive wine.

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Now, on to the recipe. A printable version is at the bottom of my post, but here is the step-by-step with photos.

**I originally published this recipe in a piece called “When Life Gives You Tomatoes, Make Crostini” on DCFud.com, a great online food magazine covering the DC metro area. Check it out!**

Slow Roasted Tomatoes

 Ingredients:

  • Lots of smaller tomatoes such as roma, cherry, or grape, halved—about 8 cups (they shrink during the roasting process)
  • 1/4 cup Olive oil
  • salt and pepper
  • pinch or two of red pepper flakes to taste
  • fresh herbs—oregano and thyme are my favorites
  • 4 garlic cloves, peeled and very thinly sliced

To prepare:

Preheat oven to 250 degrees.

Place all ingredients in a large mixing bowl. Toss gently to coat the tomatoes and spread the entire mixture evenly on a parchment lined, large rimmed baking sheet or two sheets. You want an even layer with no overlapping.

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Roast for 4-6 hours, gently tossing occasionally (or just shake and rotate the pan). The time is broad, I know, but it depends on the juiciness and size of your tomatoes and your oven. The tomatoes will shrink and their juices will dry slightly. Don’t take them too far; you want them to still have some juiciness. This really needs to be judged by eye, so just check on them occasionally.

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Enjoy straight from the oven, or transfer, along with all juices and herbs, to a mason jar or other storage container, cover with more olive oil and store in refrigerator.

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Note: The olive oil will harden upon refrigeration. Allow refrigerated tomatoes to sit at room temperature for 30-40 minutes before using.

Slow Roasted Tomato and Goat Cheese Crostini

Ingredients:

  • Baguette, or any good bread, sliced 1/4 inch thick on an angle
  • slow roasted tomatoes
  • Fresh goat cheese
  • Fresh basil

To prepare:

Drizzle or brush bread slices lightly with olive oil, and either toast in a 350 degree oven 10-15 minutes, or gently toast in a grill pan or skillet until lightly golden on both sides, but still tender in the middle. Transfer to a platter and smear with a tablespoon or two of goat cheese, top with oven roasted tomatoes, and sprinkle with fresh chopped basil. Enjoy!

Slow Roasted Tomato and Goat Cheese Crostini

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Time: 4-6 hours
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

For the Slow Roasted Tomatoes:

Ingredients:

  • Lots of smaller tomatoes such as roma, cherry, or grape, halved—about 8 cups (they shrink during the roasting process)
  • 1/4 cup Olive oil
  • salt and pepper
  • pinch or two of red pepper flakes to taste
  • fresh herbs, oregano and thyme are my favorites
  • 4 garlic cloves, peeled and very thinly sliced

To prepare:

Preheat oven to 250 degrees.

Place all ingredients in a large mixing bowl. Toss gently to coat the tomatoes and spread the entire mixture evenly on a parchment-lined, large rimmed baking sheet or sheets. You want an even layer with no overlapping.

Roast for 4-6 hours, gently tossing occasionally (or just shake and rotate the pan). The time is broad, I know, but it depends on the juiciness and size of your tomatoes and your oven. The tomatoes will shrink and their juices will dry slightly. Don’t take them too far; you want them to still have some juiciness. This really needs to be judged by eye, so just check on them occasionally.

Enjoy straight from the oven, or transfer, along with all juices and herbs, to a mason jar or other storage container, cover with more olive oil and store in refrigerator.

Note: The olive oil will harden upon refrigeration. Allow refrigerated tomatoes to sit at room temperature for 30-40 minutes before using.

To make and assemble the Slow Roasted Tomato and Goat Cheese Crostini:

Ingredients:

  • Baguette, or any good bread, sliced 1/4 inch thick on an angle
  • Oven roasted tomatoes
  • Fresh goat cheese
  • Fresh basil

To prepare:

Drizzle or brush bread slices lightly with olive oil, and either toast in a 350 degree oven 10-15 minutes, or gently toast in a grill pan or skillet until lightly golden on both sides, but still tender in the middle. Transfer to a platter and smear each with a tablespoon or two of goat cheese, top with oven roasted tomatoes, and sprinkle with fresh chopped basil. Enjoy!

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Vanilla Bean Scones with a Vanilla Bean Glaze

Happy New Year to you all. In the spirit of resolution making, yesterday I resolved to do two things: Delete my Facebook account and make Vanilla Bean Scones. Odd combination, perhaps, but it just worked out that way. Instead of setting some unreachable, obscure resolution, I went with two pretty much instantly gratifying goals. It worked.

Facebook, for me, was like some weird, grown-up (sort of) popularity contest. Having never been a super popular person, nor cared about being popular, I always had this nagging inner turmoil regarding my Facebook usage. Why do I care how many “likes” I get? Why do I not really know half the people I am “friends” with? I do not want to read personal, often graphic health details; I do not want to read religious or political rants. I found myself posting less and less, and I didn’t want to be one of those weird creepers who has a Facebook account but pretends like they don’t—a little too much like voyeurism for my liking. As much as I really did enjoy certain people’s pictures, posts, and comments, it was such a time suck—sucking time away from what I really want to do: write, cook, read, decide what I want to do with my life!

Anyway, my answer was twofold. Rid my life of Facebook and bake something to get my creative writing juices flowing again. Kitchen therapy fixes almost everything, and what it doesn’t fix it at least soothes for a while, and I needed some soothing. So, I made scones.

I made a version of these scones about a year or so ago after watching Ree Drummond AKA The Pioneer Woman make them on her show. I am wild about vanilla, especially when vanilla beans are involved. When I saw her make these, I knew I had to try them.

They were good—very tasty—but they needed some fiddling. So, I fiddled and came up with this recipe. Much, much better. Still soft and buttery, but not so crumbly they fall apart in the glaze.

And, how appropriate to make scones on Downton Abbey premier day! How very British of me.

Here’s the delicious recipe with step-by-step pictures:

Vanilla Bean Scones with a Vanilla Bean Glaze

Makes 24 scones

Ingredients:

Scones:
2 whole vanilla beans
1 cup heavy cream
3 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
2/3 cups granulated sugar
1 and ½ tablespoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 sticks (1/2 pound) unsalted butter, diced and very cold
1 egg

Glaze:
1 whole vanilla bean
1/2 to ¾ cup milk, start with ½ but you may need the full ¾ cup
5 cups powdered sugar

To Prepare:

For the scones:
Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.
Split the vanilla beans in half lengthwise and scrape out all the vanilla seeds inside.
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In a large mixing bowl, stir together the flour, granulated sugar, baking powder, salt, and vanilla seeds. With a pastry cutter, two butter knives, or your fingers, cut the cold butter into the flour mixture. Keep going until the mixture resembles crumbs.
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Mix the cream with the egg in a large, spouted measuring cup. Pour the cream in slowly while gently stirring the dry ingredients with a fork just until it comes together.
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Turn the dough onto a floured surface and lightly press it together until it forms a rough rectangle. Cut dough in half and stack one half on top of the other, press back into a rough rectangle. Repeat this process one more time. The stacking process creates perfect, flaky layers. I do this same trick when I make biscuits.
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Use your hands or a rolling pin to roll into a rectangle about 12-by-7 inches and 1/2-to-3/4-inches thick. Then cut the rectangle into 12 squares/rectangles.
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Next, cut each square/rectangle in half diagonally, to form two triangles. Transfer to a parchment lined cookie sheet and bake for 17 minutes. The bottoms will just be getting golden, but the tops should still be quite pale.
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Allow to cool completely before glazing.For the glaze:

Split the vanilla bean in half lengthwise and scrape out the seeds.Mix the powdered sugar, vanilla seeds, and milk in a large bowl, adding more powdered sugar or milk if necessary to get the right consistency. Stir or whisk until completely smooth and pourable.

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One at a time, carefully dunk each cooled scone in the glaze, turning it over to coat completely. (Your hands are the best tools for this. It’s messy, but so much easier than anything else I’ve tried. So wash your hands and roll up your sleeves.)
Once dunked, transfer to parchment paper. I do this in two steps, because as they sit the glaze will pool up a little. So after about 20 minutes, I carefully transfer the glazed scones to a fresh sheet of parchment so I don’t end up with a thick bottom layer of glaze when they set completely.
Alternatively, you can just dip the tops, or you can use a spoon to zig-zag the glaze over the tops. I go for the total submersion method.
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Enjoy! The vanilla beans really do make these so special. I hope you love them.
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PS: My daughter wanted to help me type; this is her contribution. She typed it all by her little self: “Ava and mommy made scones we had fun.” It’s the truth.

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Peach Muffins

This is the first recipe I came up with after a recent peach-picking trip to Hollin Farms with my kids. On the drive home, my son was already devouring a peach, and I was already thinking of what I would make with the fuzzy beauties.

Before I moved on to peach pie and peaches over vanilla ice cream (my favorite), I was determined to use them in some kind of breakfast recipe. Peach pancakes crossed my mind, obviously fresh peaches sliced up on yogurt or french toast would be delicious, but then my thoughts landed on muffins. Peaches with brown sugar and vanilla? Yes, please. I’m not really sure why peach muffins aren’t as common as banana or blueberry, but maybe this recipe will change that.

PS: I’ve got a few more peach recipes to come. (We picked lots!). Stay tuned.

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Peach Muffins

 Makes 12 muffins

Ingredients:

  • 1 ½ cups peeled and chopped peaches (should be about 2-3 peaches)
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • 1 ¾ cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon fine salt
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1/2  cup milk
  • 1/3 cup vegetable oil or any flavorless cooking oil
  • 1 egg
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • granulated sugar for sprinkling

To prepare:

Preheat oven to 400. Line a muffin tin with 12 paper liners.

Stir flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, and ginger in a large mixing bowl and set aside.

Stir brown sugar, sour cream, milk, oil, egg, and vanilla in a medium bowl.

Add wet ingredients to dry along with the peaches.

Stir just until combined. I use a fork, because it really prevents over mixing. As I’ve said before, muffin batter should be lumpy and kind of ugly. You will end up with the yummiest, most tender muffins this way. Trust me.

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Scoop your gently mixed batter into muffin tins. Sprinkle tops with sugar if you want a crackly, sparkly crust.

Bake in preheated oven for 15-17 minutes or until muffins are domed and lightly golden and a toothpick comes out clean.

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Enjoy!

Check out my other muffin recipes: Pumpkin Banana Muffins, Mini Mini Chocolate Chip Muffins, Mini Spiced Banana Muffins

Pumpkin Banana Muffins

I realize it’s not really the season for pumpkin recipes, but it’s kind of a dreary day and I felt like baking something. So, I started rustling around in my kitchen, looking for inspiration. Of course I had a single, over-ripe banana staring at me from my fruit bowl, and upon further investigation, I found a lonesome can of pumpkin purée lingering in my pantry. I decided to introduce the two, and this is what I came up with.

(I think my kids will be very happy when they get home from school today.)

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Pumpkin Banana Muffins

Makes 22 muffins

Ingredients:

dry:

  • 3 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder

wet:

  • 4 eggs
  • 1 15 ounce can of pumpkin puree
  • 1 very ripe banana, mashed
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 cup light brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil

To prepare:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line muffin tins with paper liners.

In a medium bowl, whisk together dry ingredients and set aside.

In a large mixing bowl, combine wet ingredients and mix well. (I used my potato masher and really squashed everything together.)

Add dry ingredients to the wet mixture, and mix gently with a wooden spoon or rubber/silicon spatula. Don’t whisk! Don’t over-mix! Muffin batter is supposed to be kind of lumpy and unattractive. Just fold together until the flour is combined.

Scoop batter into muffin tins. I used a large ice-cream scoop and filled them right to the top of the liners.

Bake in preheated oven for 25 minutes.

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Enjoy!

 

Jacques Torres’ Famous Chocolate Chip Cookies

Chocolate Chip Cookies: Ever since I discovered Martha Stewart’s Crisp and Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookie recipe, I’ve looked no further. I could make them in my sleep; everyone loves them; they are just so good—chewy and bendy. In fact, every time I make them I say, “these are the best cookies I’ve ever made,” and my son always smiles, rolls his eyes, and says, “You say that every time!” It’s become a joke between us, but they really are! It’s like I forget how irresistibly good a fresh, warm chocolate chip cookie is—even for me, a girl whose salty tooth is far more demanding than her sweet tooth.

So, over the years I’ve been hearing this constant buzz about Jacques Torres, AKA Mr. Chocolate, and his famous NY Times cookie recipe. I thought to myself, “how good can they really be?” I mean, chocolate chip cookies are great, and yes, I’ve been known to eat a few right off the tray while they’re still warm and melty… Is there any other way?? But they’re just one of those things. I didn’t feel the urge to try this hyped up, fancy recipe for something I consider homey and traditional.

Alas, my curiosity got the better of me. Amazon.com supplied me with the bittersweet chocolate fèves, and I followed the recipe exactly—something I never do! Oh boy am I happy I did. Jacques Torres, I doubt you will ever read this, but I am a believer. These cookies are like the Rolls Royce of chocolate chip cookies. They are chewy and soft; just a little crunchy around the edges; loaded with silky layers of chocolate—and the sprinkle of sea salt on top just sends my taste buds to the moon. Salty. Sweet. Irresistible.

I’m still devoted to my favorite recipe (which I hope you will try too!), but these will be my special recipe that I whip out when I’m feeling a little naughty and indulgent. I hope you try them, I promise you won’t be disappointed.

Just a few notes:

Making the dough is pretty standard, but definitely fold the chocolate pieces in by hand. The large, flat size of the chocolate disks is necessary for the layers, and they will break if you toss them in the mixer. (A few will break when you scoop them, but don’t worry!)

Because the dough is cold from the 24-36 hours in the fridge, scooping it is kind of a pain in the neck. I used my biggest scoop, which is two inches in diameter and holds about 1/4 cup of dough. I kind of squished it in with my palm, then dropped it onto the cookie sheet. This part might frustrate you (as it did me!), but I promise it’s worth it!

Last thing: these are meant to be eaten warm, and they really should be, but they are delicious cool as well. How fun would it be to serve a warm chocolate chip cookie to your dinner guests, though. If you had these scooped and ready to go into the oven, you could pop them in half way through dinner, and make your friends feel very special. And very, very happy. The best dinner guests are the ones who aren’t afraid to lick gooey chocolate off their fingers in front of you…

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Jacques Torres’ Chocolate Chip Cookies

Recipe taken from The New York Times

Time: 45 minutes (for 16-cookie batch), plus at least 24 hours’ chilling

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups minus 2 tablespoons (8 1/2 ounces) cake flour
  • 1 2/3 cups (8 1/2 ounces) bread flour
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 2 1/2 sticks (1 1/4 cups) unsalted butter
  • 1 1/4 cups (10 ounces) light brown sugar
  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons (8 ounces) granulated sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 teaspoons natural vanilla extract
  • 1 1/4 pounds bittersweet chocolate disks or fèves, at least 60 percent cacao content (see note)
  • Sea salt

To Prepare:

1. Sift flours, baking soda, baking powder and salt into a bowl. Set aside.

2. Using a mixer fitted with paddle attachment, cream butter and sugars together until very light, about 5 minutes. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing well after each addition. Stir in the vanilla. Reduce speed to low, add dry ingredients and mix until just combined, 5 to 10 seconds. Drop chocolate pieces in and incorporate them without breaking them. Press plastic wrap against dough and refrigerate for 24 to 36 hours. Dough may be used in batches, and can be refrigerated for up to 72 hours.

3. When ready to bake, preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a nonstick baking mat. Set aside.

4. Scoop 6  3 1/2-ounce mounds of dough (the size of generous golf balls) onto baking sheet, making sure to turn horizontally any chocolate pieces that are poking up; it will make for a more attractive cookie. Sprinkle lightly with sea salt and bake until golden brown but still soft, 18 to 20 minutes. Transfer sheet to a wire rack for 10 minutes, then slip cookies onto another rack to cool a bit more. Repeat with remaining dough, or reserve dough, refrigerated, for baking remaining batches the next day. Eat warm, with a big napkin.

Yield: 1 1/2 dozen 5-inch cookies.

Note: Disks are sold at Jacques Torres Chocolate; Valrhona fèves, oval-shaped chocolate pieces, are at Whole Foods (or Amazon.com)

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Enjoy!

Mini Mini Chocolate Chip Muffins

Yesterday was a snow day, the first one of the season, and although I was a little irritated that it decided to happen after my semester was over and on a Sunday, I still loved it. I loved seeing my daughter’s excitement; it reminded me of how I used to feel every time I pressed my nose against a cold window to watch snowflakes fall. It also reminded me of when my son was very young, about 2 1/2, and I picked him up from daycare early one day, just as the first snow started to fall. It was late November–we weren’t really in the full Christmas swing yet–but when he saw the snow he screeched with excitement, “Santa! Santa is coming soon!” and my heart melted.

There is something magical about snow, something I’m glad I never lost when I grew up. A magic that is described so beautifully in the following quote–a quote that I loved so much I tore it out of a magazine years ago and have had hanging in a frame in my office ever since.

“I am younger each year at the first snow. When I see it, suddenly, in the air, all little and white and moving; then I am in love again, and very young and I believe everything.”–Anne Sexton, in a letter to W.D. Snodgrass (November 28, 1958)

Magic.

Something I love, love, love to do on a snow day is bake. Big surprise. And since I had been eyeing this bag of mini chocolate chips in my pantry for a week or so, wondering what I was going to do with them, the snow day was the perfect opportunity to put them to use.

These muffins are the cutest. A double dose of mini, I use mini semisweet chocolate chips and I make them extra cute by using mini muffin tins. You could certainly make them regular size, and use regular chocolate chips without losing any of their deliciousness (though, you will lose some cuteness I’m afraid). They are so moist, have a perfectly sweet vanilla flavor, and a balancing tang from the sour cream.

This batter is fantastic, and you can use it for any kind of muffin, but the chocolate chips are really, really good. The trick to keeping them suspended and evenly distributed in the batter is to mix them with a tablespoon or two of flour, just enough so they’re evenly coated, before you add them to the mix. This works for anything you’re stirring into batter, and if you’ve ever had your ingredients sink to the bottom of your muffins, this trick will make you very happy!

Here’s the recipe.

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Mini Mini Chocolate Chip Muffins

(makes 48 mini muffins or 24 regular muffins)

Ingredients:

  • 2 sticks unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 1 1/2 cups sugar
  • 3  eggs, at room temperature
  • 2 tablespoons pure vanilla extract
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • 2 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine salt
  • one 12 ounce bag mini (or regular) chocolate chips

To Prepare:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Place paper liners in muffin tins, and for a little extra insurance give them a very light spray of nonstick cooking spray.

Stir dry ingredients together in a bowl and set aside. Reserve about 1/4 cup of chocolate chips for sprinkling on top, and place remaining chips in a separate bowl. Add about two tablespoons of the dry ingredients to the chips and toss to coat.

In a stand mixer, cream butter and sugar for about 5 minutes until light and fluffy. Add eggs and mix to combine. Scrape sides, add sour cream, vanilla and milk, and mix once more until combined.

With mixer on low, add dry ingredients, then quickly add the chips that have been dusted with flour. Do not over mix. Once chips are just incorporated, turn mixer off and give the batter a final mix by hand with a rubber spatula, making sure to scrape the bottom.

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Fill muffin tins to the top, and top each with a few chocolate chips.

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Bake for about 20 minutes, until just cooked and a toothpick comes out with a few moist crumbs attached.

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Enjoy!

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